Posts in: October

The New “Centralized Partnership Audit Regime” – A Seismic Shift or Much Ado about Nothing?

October 31, 2017 Business planning, IRS, Tax Planning Comments Off on The New “Centralized Partnership Audit Regime” – A Seismic Shift or Much Ado about Nothing?

An article on IRS audits…just what you needed to read before going to bed tonight, and I’m not kidding. Now, don’t be embarrassed if you haven’t heard of the Centralized Partnership Audit Regime (“CPAR”). If you think it sounds like something out of a George Orwell novel that only CPA’s and Tax Attorneys care about – well then, you’re half right. It’s not from Nineteen Eighty-Four. It is a real thing; the sort of thing people in my profession like to bring up when they’re trying to sound smart at cocktail parties – the most boring cocktail parties EVER.

Anyway, despite the sleep-inducing name, the CPAR is something many of our clients need to be aware of – namely clients who file (or should be filing) an annual Form 1065 Partnership Tax Return. So, if you are involved in a partnership, try to stay awake – this is for you.

A little background: The CPAR was enacted into law by the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2015 (“BBA”). As with most federal laws, the statute itself is nice and all, but the real meat comes in the form of the administrative rules implementing the law. The Proposed Rules for the BBA were introduced earlier this year, and barring something really crazy (which can’t be ruled out in the Washington D.C. of 2017) they will go into effect for all tax years beginning on or after January 1, 2018.

In a nutshell, the CPAR will replace the rules that currently govern partnership audits (which come from the Tax Equity and Fiscal Responsibility Act of 1982 (“TEFRA”). The intent of the CPAR is to make it simpler and easier for the examine partnerships, particularly large partnerships with multiple tiers or levels of ownership.

So, What’s New in the CPAR?

1) “Partnership Representative” Replaces “Tax Matters Partner”: Currently, a partnership is required to designate a “Tax Matters Partner.” This is typically done in an Operating or Limited Partnership Agreement. While the Tax Matters Partner can bind the partnership in connection with an audit, it cannot bind the individual partners. In addition, a partner who is not the Tax Matters Partner has certain rights during an audit, including notification rights and the right to participate in the proceedings.

Under the CPAR, the Tax Matters Partner is replaced by the concept of a “Partnership Representative” who is the sole point of contact between the partnership and the IRS. Unlike with the Tax Matters Partner, all partners and the partnership itself are bound by the actions of the Partnership Representative and no one other than the Partnership Representative is vested with a statutory right to participate in a partnership-level audit proceeding. Neither state law nor the partnership agreement itself may limit the authority of the Partnership Representative when it comes to an audit.

Under the CPAR, a partnership must designate its Partnership Representative in the partnership’s annual tax return. Unlike with the Tax Matters Partner, the Partnership Representative may or may not be a partner. The only hard and fast requirement is that the Partnership Representative have a “substantial presence” in the United States. The Partnership Representative designation must be made separately for each tax year and is effective only for that year. One Orwellian tidbit here is that if you fail to designate a Partnership Representative, the IRS is allowed to pick one for you!!! This is a little scary. Again, the Partnership Representative does not have to be a partner in the partnership – so it is at least conceivable that the IRS could appoint as Partnership Representative a non-partner third-party who then becomes the sole point of contact for the IRS regarding the audit and is vested with full authority to bind the partnership in an audit.

Given the above, under the CPAR it becomes more important than ever that you don’t blow off your annual 1065 Partnership Return. File the return on time and name a Partnership Representative! A pretty simply recipe to avoid IRS trouble. I have seen some chatter online about amending operating or partnership agreements to make this designation. However, while this is certainly a good place for the partners agree in writing as to who will be designated the Partnership Representative (or how the Partnership will choose the Partnership Representative), the actual designation must be made on the filed partnership return.

2) “Imputed Underpayment” and the “Push Out Election”: These will become important if you are ever in an audit, but we will not be going into detail here. They are technical changes regarding how the IRS notifies the partnership of an amount owed after audit, and how and when a partnership can decides to pay what is owed at the partnership level, or “push out” that liability to the individual partners.

Am I Stuck with the CPAR?

The short answer is “not necessarily.” Partnerships with 100 or fewer partners – all of whom are considered “Eligible Partners” by the IRS can opt out of the CPAR. Eligible Partners are defined as:

  1. Individuals
  2. C-Corporations
  3. S-Corporations
  4. The Estates of Deceased Partners

So, if any partner is a trust, a disregarded entity (such as a single-member LLC), or another partnership, opting out is simply not an option. Just like naming a Partnership Representative, opting out of CPAR is done annually, when you file your 1065 partnership return. In order to successfully opt out, you will need to provide the IRS with the name, tax ID number, and federal tax classifications of all partners. Also, the election to opt out only applies to the year to which your tax return applies, so it will need to be done each year going forward.

If you opt out, the IRS will be required to initiate deficiency proceedings at the partner level (instead of the partnership level) to adjust items associated with the partnership and thereby assess and collect any tax that may result from those adjustments. This makes life harder for the IRS, and for this reason, it will likely make sense for eligible partnerships to opt out of CPAR – if they can. The decision to opt out can be made in an operating or partnership agreement, but will need to be submitted to the IRS each year as part of filing the 1065 partnership return.

Because opting out makes a partnership audit more difficult for them, the IRS has stated its intention to closely scutinize any partnership’s decision to opt out. This will include analyzing whether the partnership correctly identified all of its partners. For example, the IRS could conduct a review of a partnership’s partners to confirm that none are acting as nominees or as agents for a beneficial owner.

At the end of the day, for most of our clients, the shift to CPAR will not be noticed. Most partnerships don’t get audited, and if they do, the partners work together to get through it. However, by taking the steps to opt out of CPAR (if eligible), or to make sure a Partnership Representative is named (if opting out isn’t a possibility), you can avoid running into a CPAR problem that could have otherwise been avoided.

8 Core Tax Concepts Every Entrepreneur Needs to Know

October 24, 2017 Business planning, Corporations, Small Business, Tax Planning Comments Off on 8 Core Tax Concepts Every Entrepreneur Needs to Know

Of the many virtues that entrepreneurs have, one such virtue is the desire and ability to get as much information and knowledge as they can by reading books, attending speaking events, researching on the internet, etc. However, ‘taxes’ aren’t one of the topics entrepreneurs seek out, and it’s for a justifiable reason.

Many believe the topic of taxes to be either too boring or overly complicated, and it typically is when presented improperly.  Yet, so many business owners are starving and anxious to learn tax and legal principles. Inspired by those teachers of tax and legal topics that make it truly interesting, I have tried to summarize in this article the top 8 Core Tax Concepts that every entrepreneur needs to know:

  1. The IRS treats different types income VERY differently. This principle is at the CORE of so much of our advising. For example, income you make in your operational business is NOT taxed the same as income you make in your rental real estate “business”. So as you read books, attend speaking events, etc., keep in mind that the principles taught (and the advice if you’re talking to your tax professional) are going to depend in large part on the TYPE of income.
  2. Corporate Income Tax versus Pass-through Entities i.e. LLC’s, S-corps, Sole Props, Partnerships. A pass-through entity is a business entity that does NOT pay income tax at the “entity” level but rather, the income tax liability is passed-through to the owner(s) of the business (hence avoiding the double taxation that is often associated with c-corporations). In other words, the manner in which income generated by an LLC taxed as a sole proprietorship or partnership is very different than a c-corporation. There are a lot of false assumptions that entrepreneurs have about their tax situation and a lot of that comes from internet research – not because the article was bad, but because they simply misapplied it to their situation. For example, if an entrepreneur whose business is taxed as a partnership comes across an article about business taxes is going to become very confused if the articles is referring to corporate income taxation, unless they REALIZE the article is not referring to “pass-through entities” such as theirs. The result would be that if that entrepreneur tried to apply the principles in that article to their business, it would be confusing and likely not helpful.
  3. There are all sorts of taxes – It’s important to keep them straight. If you regularly read books, attend speaking events, listen to podcasts, etc., and you hear taxes, don’t assume it’s ALWAYS about income taxes. For example, technically, self-employment taxes, which is discussed frequently, is different than income tax. And when you’re in the world of small business, real estate, estate planning, etc., trying to get as much “self-learning” as you can, there’s even more types of tax out there which may or may not apply to you. For example, there’s income tax, self-employment tax, estate tax, property tax, gift tax, payroll tax, sales tax, and many more. So always make sure you’re aware of which type of tax that author, or speaker, etc., is referring to.
  4. Generally, a tax-write off is whatever costs and expenses are customary and appropriate in your industry and helpful to your business. Actually, the verbiage in the tax code is “ordinary” and “necessary”, but thanks to the courts, those words have been defined to mean “customary” and “appropriate”. So if you’re a house flipper out genuinely trying to make money in your business and you have costs and expenses along the way, you’ll typically be able to write off any and all expenses that are customary and appropriate for someone in the house flipping business.
  5. Some business “write-off’s” must be amortized over time. With some exception, when you/your business buys equipment or assets, generally that cost IS deductible BUT will have to be spread out or amortized over multiple tax years based on the IRS schedule for that particular asset/equipment.
  6. Basis. One of the core principles of taxation is that your cost to acquire an asset is called your basis, and that’s important because when you decide to sell that asset, the tax consequences of that transaction will be determined “based” (bad pun) on the selling price of the asset/equipment over and above the basis (note: by the time you sell that asset, the basis will have adjusted and so it’s referred to as your “adjusted basis”). That excess amount, if any, is a capital gain and is typically taxed differently than your “ordinary” business income. Selling an asset in your business (or the business itself) can become quite complicated, but so long as you remember this core tax concept, it will help you when discussing transactions with your tax professional(s).
  7. Most tax deductions are “entity-agnostic”. Most of the tax write-off’s that a typical entrepreneur are going to have will be available to them regardless of whether they operate as a sole proprietorship, LLC, or corporation. For example, if you’re trying to claim expenses associated with your business that you incur in the course of traveling, meeting with clients, etc., those costs will generally be deductible regardless of whether you operate your business as a sole proprietor, partnership, s-corporation, or c-corporation.
  8. Don’t let the “tax tail wag the dog”. I’m not suggesting your business is a “dog”, but if your business doesn’t need a certain expense or you wouldn’t buy a certain expense otherwise, it usually doesn’t make sense to incur such an expense simply to claim another tax write-off. For example, it’s exciting when you read a book or attend a speaking event that mentions a certain tax write-off, but if you don’t need that expensive new piece of equipment, particularly if you’re just starting out in your business, that huge expense, notwithstanding the fact that it is deductible, could run your business into the ground.

In sum, keep reading, attending speaking events, listening to podcasts, but if you will keep these core principles in mind you’ll have much better success in implementing some of the strategies you read/learn about. This article is not intended as legal or tax advice. If you’re an entrepreneur or potential entrepreneur and have tax and legal questions, please contact our office.

Creative Planning Options with a Revocable Living Trust

October 17, 2017 Business planning, Estate Planning, Uncategorized Comments Off on Creative Planning Options with a Revocable Living Trust

Estate planning is something most know they should do, but most American adults simply haven’t gotten it done.  In a survey available from AARP,  60% of American adults do not have an estate plan.  The number gets even higher for some minority populations.  In most cases, this is simply due to procrastination that “I just haven’t gotten around to it.”  Many people that I speak to as a lawyer simply don’t understand the consequences of passing away without an estate plan.

One of the primary reasons for a Trust is to avoid probate, which is a court supervised process for the distribution of a decedent’s assets (especially real estate) when a person dies without a trust.  However, the revocable living trust affords many creative planning opportunities that generally cannot be accomplished without a comprehensive estate plan.  Many individuals who have not consulted with a professional estate planner do not know the creative strategies that can be accomplished through a trust.  Examples of some creative planning opportunities include:

Planning for the Disabled

In general, eligibility for certain need based government benefits such as disability or SSI have restrictions based on income and assets.    Many people mistakenly assume that if they have a child or other dependent that is disabled or who otherwise relies on government benefits, that they should disinherit these disabled dependents in order to ensure that the dependents continue to qualify for disability benefits.  Disinheriting a dependent entirely just so they can continue to get disability represents a fundamental misunderstanding of the available options and often times simply indicates bad planning.  A “special needs trust” is a special type of trust that can allow a dependent to potentially receive funds and benefits from the trust without interfering with government benefits.    These types of trusts require very precise terms and conditions so that any benefits from the trust do not disqualify the dependent’s eligibility for the particular government benefit to which the dependent is or may be eligible.

Asset Protection for the Beneficiaries (Your Kids/Heirs)

A trust can provide significant asset protection for children who have difficulties handling money or who are otherwise high risk.  Most states allow trusts to contain “spendthrift” provisions which can restrict the ability of creditors of the beneficiary from reaching the beneficiary’s interest in the trust.  In general, a creditor can only reach assets from a debtor which the debtor himself/herself can reach.  Different states may have different rules and there may be exceptions for certain types of creditors (for example, claims by a spouse for alimony or child support may not be protected by a spendthrift clause).  In addition, the protection of the spendthrift provision general applies only to the beneficiary, not the original creator (i.e. the grantor) of the trust.  However, the spendthrift provision could be an effective planning tool to provide for your beneficiary without risking that the trust could be subject to that beneficiary’s creditors.

Planning for Blended or Non-traditional Families

Lets face it, our conception of the family unit from generations ago is constantly changing and evolving.   Many of us are now raised in blended families, or by individuals who were not our blood parents, or live in various types of family arrangements.  In most cases, the law has not evolved in recognition of these different family arrangements.   A primary purpose of the revocable living trust is to dictate how your loved ones will share in your legacy.  With a Trust, you can help ensure that certain individuals do (or don’t) share in your legacy.    Otherwise, leaving this decision up to the laws of the state could result in people you care for being cut off from your estate.   The most common example is someone who divorces and remarries but has children from the original marriage.  In many states, if that person passes without an estate plan (will or trust), the estate passes to the surviving spouse and the children from the first marriage are cut off.   Proper planning using the revocable living trust will help ensure that the people you wish to benefit will actually receive those benefits.

Planning and Supporting a Legacy

A trust is a very flexible document and can be drafted in different ways to support the ones you love but not allow the assets to be wasted.  Do you want to provide support to a grandchild, but not have it affect their eligibility for financial aide for college?  Do you want to help a child start a business, but not unless he/she first gets a college degree?   Do you want to assist your children to buy their first home, or finance their wedding?  A revocable living trust allows you to set terms and conditions for your generosity to ensure that your gift is used the way you wanted it to be used, and for nothing else.

Of course if you’re one of those people who feel that “I can’t take it with me so I’m going to spend it all now,” then perhaps these planning opportunities are not for you.  But for those who wish to leave a legacy behind for your loved ones (or loved causes) future and want it protected and preserved for this purpose, the revocable living trust can provide infinite possibilities to secure your legacy.